TRANSMISSION- Accidents



Aging And Unstable, The Nation’s Electrical Grid Is ‘The Weakest Link’
audio interview with Gretchen Bakke | August 22, 2016
Heard on Fresh Air

In her new book, The Grid, Gretchen Bakke argues that the under-funded power grid is incapable of taking the U.S. into a new energy future. She explains the challenges to Fresh Air‘s Dave Davies….Listen to interview or read transcript>>
npr.org

 

The 10 Worst Blackouts Of The Last 50 Years
A majority of the world’s top 10 worst black outs in the last five decades occurred due to technical faults and human errors but natural calamities have also taken their toll. Power-technology.com lists the top 10 worst blackouts over the last 50 years, based on the number of people affected.
– India – July 30-31, 2012 (700 million people affected)
– India – January 2, 2001 (230 million people affected)
– Java and Bali, Indonesia – 18 August 2005 (120 million people affected)
– Southern Brazil – 11 March 1999 (97 million people affected)
– Brazil and Paraguay – 10 November 2009 (67 million people affected)
– Italy – 28 September 2003 (57 million people affected)
– Northeast United States and Canada – 14-15 August 2003 (50 million people affected)
– Northeast United States and Northern Canada – 9 November 1965 (30 million people affected)
– New York, USA – 13 July 1977 (9 million people affected)
– Quebec, Canada – 13 March 1989 (6 million people affected)

power-technology.com

 

‘Crash Override’: The Malware That Took Down A Power Grid
By Andy Greenberg | June 12,2017

At midnight, a week before last Christmas, hackers struck an electric transmission station north of the city of Kiev, blacking out a portion of the Ukrainian capital equivalent to a fifth of its total power capacity. The outage lasted about an hour—hardly a catastrophe. But now cybersecurity researchers have found disturbing evidence that the blackout may have only been a dry run. The hackers appear to have been testing the most evolved specimen of grid-sabotaging malware ever observed in the wild…Learn more>>   wired.com