Biomass- Feedstocks



Biomass Resources in the United States (2012 UCSUSA.ORG)
ucsusa.org

 

BIOMASS- FEEDSTOCK UCS TOTAL POTENTIAL -The United States has the potential to dramatically expand biomass use for fuel and power…Learn more>>

 

 

<<enlarge map

 

 

 

 

BIOMASS- FEEDSTOCK UCS RESOURCES

-Energy crops offer the greatest opportunity to expand energy production from biomass…Learn more>>

 

 

enlarge map>>

 

 

 

BIOMASS- FEEDSTOCK UCS AGRICULTURAL

-Agricultural residues can provide significant biomass without expanding the footprint of agriculture…Learn more>>

 

 

 

 <<enlarge map>>

 

 

BIOMASS- FEEDSTOCK UCS WASTE MATERIALS

-Waste materials for bioenergy production benefit from an existing infrastructure for collection…Learn more>>

 

 

enlarge map>>

 

 

 

BIOMASS- FEEDSTOCK UCS FORESTS

-Forests offer a limited source of new biomass resources…Learn more>>

 

 

<<enlarge map

 

 

ucsusa.org

 

Feedstocks For Biofuels And More
energy.gov
BIOMASS- WHAT IS, GOV.

A feedstock is defined as any renewable, biological material that can be used directly as a fuel, or converted to another form of fuel or energy product. Biomass feedstocks are the plant and algal materials used to derive fuels like ethanol, butanol, biodiesel, and other hydrocarbon fuels. Examples of biomass feedstocks include corn starch, sugarcane juice, crop residues such as corn stover and sugarcane bagasse, purpose-grown grass crops, and woody plants. The Bioenergy Technologies Office …Read more and/or watch the video explaination>>  energy.gov

 

Bioenergy (Biofuels and Biomass)
eesi.org
Biomass can be used to produce renewable electricity, thermal energy, or transportation fuels (biofuels). Biomass is defined as living or recently dead organisms and any byproducts of those organisms, plant or animal. The term is generally understood to exclude coal, oil, and other fossilized remnants of organisms, as well as soils. In this strict sense, biomass encompasses all living things. In the context of biomass energy, however, the term refers to those crops, residues, and other biological materials that can be used as a substitute for fossil fuels in the production of energy and other products. Living biomass takes in carbon as it grows and releases this carbon when used for energy, resulting in a carbon-neutral cycle that does not increase the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases….Learn more>>   eesi.org
Biomass Energy
-Biofuels
-Biobased Products
-Biomass Feedstocks- Some of the most common (and/or most promising) biomass feedstocks are: Grains and starch crops – sugar cane, corn, wheat, sugar beets, industrial sweet potatoes, etc.
-Agricultural residues – Corn stover, wheat straw, rice straw, orchard prunings, etc.
-Food waste – waste produce, food processing waste, etc.
-Forestry materials – Logging residues, forest thinnings, etc.
-Animal byproducts – Tallow, fish oil, manure, etc.
-Energy crops – Switchgrass, miscanthus, hybrid poplar, willow, algae, etc.
-Urban and suburban wastes – municipal solid wastes (MSW), lawn wastes, wastewater treatment sludge, urban wood wastes, disaster debris, trap grease, yellow grease, waste cooking oil, etc.
-Biomass and Land Use
eesi.org

 

Biomass Feedstocks for Combustion
January 31, 2014; Contributors to This Article, Author Daniel Ciolkosz, Extension Associate, Penn State

Thought about growing a biomass crop for combustion fuel on your farm? This article offers three questions farmers can ask to evaluate growing energy producing combustion crops. It examines wood, woody crops and grasses in more detail….Learn more>>

BIOMASS- FEEDSTOCK INTO

-Introduction

 

 

 

 

 

BIOMASS- FEEDSTOCK FOREST WOOD

 

-Forest Wood

 

 

 

-Short Rotation Woody Crops

BIOMASS- FEEDSTOCK PERENIAL GRASS

-Annual and Perennial Grasses

 

 

 

 

-Crop residue from other agricultural field crops
-Animal Manure
-Scale of Production
extension.org

 

More Types Of Biomass Energy

BIOMASS- FEEDSTOCK EARTHPEACE

-Wood
-Biogas
-Landfill Gas
-Fermentation